FolkWords Reviews

‘The Longing Kind’ by Maz O’Connor “... an album to hear, absorb and savour”

(March 14, 2016)

Moving away from ‘singing the tradition’ with her debut album ‘This Willowed Light’, Maz O’Connorhas spread her creative wings and released a new album of original songs reflecting on personal views, experiences and maz oconnor -longing-kindrelationships, it’s called ‘The Longing Kind’ and it’s stunning. The lyrics offer an intense poetry, the vocals echo the emotion and the music has a haunting existence that sinks deep into your being. The press blurb states the album is: Ordered like a three-act play, the album begins with songs that capture those moments of uncertainty, confusion and displacement that follow being shoved into the world from the comfort of education and family.” Heady stuff indeed, and yes there’s soul searching power to the subjective songs, not only from distilling personal experience but also from deciphering the subjects of paintings by Millais and Delaroche, before finally returning to a more understanding view of building successfully on the mistakes and muddles of youth.

There are songs that lay bare expectation and independence, there’s the contemplation on tales behind painted images and finally there’s realisation of reality, however we choose to interpret it. Listen to songs like the title track, ‘The Longing Kind’, ‘Crook of his Arm’ and ‘Greenwood Side’ through ‘Jane Grey’, ‘Coming Back Around’ and ‘A Quiet Word’ and the calibre of this lady’s songwriting becomes obvious. ‘The Longing Kind’ is an album to hear, absorb and savour. 

Maz O’Connor sings and plays guitar, tenor guitar, piano and harmonium, joining her on The Longing Kind’ are Beth Porter (cello) Matt Downer (double bass) Nick Malcolm (trumpet) Chris Hillman (pedal steel) Suzi Gage (harmony vocals) and Jim Moray (harmony vocals, drums, percussion, electric guitars, synths, Hammond organ, mandolin, harmonium, banjo). Find Mz O'Connor here: www.mazoconnor.com

Review: Tim Carroll

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