FolkWords Reviews

‘Storied Sounds’ from Tuulikki Bartosik - fascinating melange of music and sound

(April 11, 2016)

Ranging from delicately soporific through weirdly atmospheric to strangely unsettling, the fascinating melange of music and sounds on ‘Storied Sounds’, the new album from Tuulikki Bartosik, is something that you should set aside sufficient time to comprehend. In the words of the press release it’s her homage to: “... Estonian landscapes of Tuulikki’s childhood, to more storied sounds from tuulikki bartosikrecent adventures, and to family and friends.”

The result lives somewhere between soundscape and aural illustration, if the intention was to combine music with ambient sounds and field recordings to build visual images through an aural channel, then Tuulikki has been entirely successful. Naturally, such visualisation of images remains down to the ear and imagination of each listener, with each one doubtless hearing something different, taking different elements from ‘Storied Sounds’ and building their own images. Whether these tacks evoke memories or prompt imaginings doesn’t really matter, what matters is the ability of this album to take you places ... back to a past or forward into a future and that’s certainly achieved.

The album is divided into 13 tracks but the overall feel is so organic that to assimilate the experience and really feel what the artist intended, take in the entire album in one sitting. Tuulikki states: “We transfer our traditions to each other, take our world with us wherever we go, and we take something with us from every place we visit, every person we meet.” Can’t really argue with that and if ‘Storied Sounds’ reaches you in that way that’s fine too.

Contributing to this movie for your ears is Tuulikki Bartosik (free bass accordion, voice, metallophone) Timo Alakotila (piano) Villu Talsi (mandolin) and Dylan Fowler (guitar). ‘Storied Sounds’ releases under the independent UK label RootBeatRecords 

Find out more about Tuulikki Bartosik and ‘Storied Sounds’ here: tuulikkibartosik.com

Review: Tim Carroll

Click here to return to the FolkWords Reviews page