Review Archive

‘Dance Through The Storm’, the second studio album from All Things Considered

(March 09, 2013)

There’s a warm feeling of familiarity to ‘Dance Through The Storm’, the second studio album from All Things Considered. That in no way infers predictability, it simply echoes the elemental warmth that Dance through the Stormemenates from their music with its hypnotic percussion, pulsating bass and seething fiddle. Add to this powerful folk-roots concoction, some charismatic vocals and you have an album that promises and delivers much.

The band’s influences are clearly wide and expansive – blending elements of folk and roots with the edge of pop-inspired hooks - wherever the threads touch they work together to create an inimitable style where the listener is immediately ‘at home’. All Things Considered walk comfortably along many pathways – from the emotive storytelling and cutting fiddle of ‘Claustrophobia’ to the traditional, percussively embellished folk with ‘Where You Are’, featuring renowned shanty singer Chris Ricketts. There’s another trad (ish) touch through ‘Pastimes’ – with more fine percussion. Then there’s the gorgeous fiddle-led story of leaving and separation in the ballad ‘Gatwick’ (an exquisite song at odds with its title - no offence if you live there).

The eponymous ‘Dance Through The Storm’ possess an insistent drive that builds into a powerful force with vocals, fiddle and percussion swirling around each other, while ‘Long Long Ago’ offers a tale of lost love made more poignant by subtle strings and that familiar bass, percussion combination overlaid with keening fiddle.

All Things Considered are Emma Baldwin (vocals) Gethin Webster (fiddle, recorder, keys, backing vocals) Adrian Holden (acoustic guitar) Ben Halls (acoustic bass, acoustic guitar) and Phil Daniels (percussion). Joining them as guests on the album are Ian Greening (bass guitar) and Chris Ricketts (vocals – track 3). You can find ‘Dance Through The Storm’ here: www.allthingsconsidered.org.uk

Reviewer: Tim Carroll

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